Walk the Thought

think it: walk it

Lizzie Velasquez: so inspiring!

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I wasn’t going to write a post tonight but after seeing Lizzie’s video which was tweeted by a friend of mine, I had to share it.  I hadn’t heard of her before today but I was so moved by the strength of her resilience.  She has such an important lesson to teach us about overcoming adversity and the choices you must make in the face of it.  Enjoy…

 

You can visit Lizzie’s website at http://www.aboutlizzie.com/

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Is unemployment really the issue?

On the 2nd January, I wrote a post called What’s the point?  It was in response a news item I’d seen on the BBC website that morning which quoted that a large number of young people the UK feel they have nothing to live for.  It cited unemployment as the main contributing factor and stated that young people’s mental health was suffering as a consequence.  On reading around other sources and from watching the news that evening, it seemed that young people in the UK feel their lives lack meaning because a without a job they have no reason to get up in the morning and without a job they weren’t able to contribute to society.  I also had feedback that young people feel they have nothing to live for because they aren’t able to afford a house or put money by for a pension.

In my post, I felt I was being sympathetic and suggested that the reason  young people’s mental health was suffering was because they are wasting too much of their time and energy focussing on one future-oriented goal, i.e. home ownership and need to set themselves present-oriented goals to give them satisfaction in the here and now.  On reflection I would like to elaborate on that post as I feel I did not say everything that needed to be said.   What I feel is required, is a big virtual slap in the face for those who feel the Government and unemployment is to blame for young people’s ‘suffering’ mental health.

Despite leaving university 10 years ago with a first class BA degree, I am still not in a position where I have the disposable income to put aside for a deposit on a house, pay off my student loan or put any extra money towards a pension.  I have also suffered with mental health problems on and off for most of my life.  So with that in mind, I think that I’m more than qualified to have the following opinion.

I am not a fan of the current Government (I used to be a teacher) but by holding them and the current financial climate solely to blame, we are neglecting the real cause of the report’s finding that young people feel they have nothing to live for.  What I suggest is to blame is a chronic lack of self-awareness, resilience and lateral thinking amongst some young people.  It is not the lack of ownership and disposable income that causes mental suffering in this context, it is thoughts those young people have about their situation that causes their suffering.  It is their thoughts about what they ‘should’ have that cause their suffering.   It is their thoughts about what is ‘normal’ and what their entitled to that cause their suffering.  These thoughts need to change.

I would very much like to be able to own my own house without having to share part of it with the Government but just because my parents were able to (which they weren’t in my case) and my grandparents were able to, it doesn’t mean I’m entitled to it or that it is the only way to achieve happiness in life.  By holding the demand that ‘I must own my own home, it is the only way to feel successful’ or ‘I must own my own home, it is the only way to feel happy’, or ‘I must own my own home because the children I plan to have need it’, young people are setting themselves up for despair because these are demands, they are rigid, they’re all or nothing.

I’m willing to bet good money that someone comments on this saying, ‘it’s not demanding to want to own your own home; it should be a basic right’.  If they do, it will illustrate my point beautifully that some young people are chronically lacking in self-awareness.  I’m going to repeat my point from my previous post.  If you place all your happiness on the condition you achieve one future-oriented goal that you may or may not achieve, you will feel miserable; it’s a given.  Carry on with this line of thinking and you will continue feel miserable until you hopefully buy a house in 20 years’ time. Do you honestly want to delay your happiness for that long?  Stop whining about and dwelling on what you can’t get in the future and focus more closely on what you could have now that brings you satisfaction and joy.  For me, this blog brings me satisfaction and joy. I wrote a post about my experience of overcoming anxiety.  One person commented that I’d given them hope and that’s all I need.  The fact that I’ve managed to give hope to one person in the world gives me enormous satisfaction in the here and now!  By blogging about my experience in the hope it will help others helps me find meaning in the adversity I’ve faced.  I’ve made a choice.  I could have been beaten by adversity but I’ve chosen to use it for my personal growth and to support others.

This brings me on to the chronic lack of resilience in some young people.  The self-pitying whining I’ve witnessed in the press is, quite frankly, embarrassing.  I feel embarrassed because there are people in Syria and other parts of the world who have no home, no belongings, have been separated from their families and live in fear of losing their own lives.  There are people who are living through the most horrific, barbaric and degrading adversity but they carry on.  They have no choice but to carry on because they only other option is to opt out of life altogether.  When I was a teacher, I witnessed this lack of resilience in the young children I taught; I saw their defeatist attitude towards the most minor setback.  I worked extremely hard to help children build their resilience; I believe it’s one of the most important qualities we can own in life.  I had to teach them from scratch that making mistakes and learning from them is one of the best ways to learn; some lessons are forgotten but never the ones where you’ve learnt from your mistakes.  I had to teach them about acceptance; that unfairness is a part of life we will experience our entire lives and sometimes even as adults, we can’t change the unfairness, we can only accept it.

Finally, I want to talk about the chronic lack of lateral thinking.  Young people of the UK, what brings you joy and satisfaction in the here and now and how can you use it in a creative way (I don’t mean creative in as in artistic.  I’m not asking you to draw a picture of yourself playing football or baking a cake)?

I’m going to do some spoon-feeding now, because from what I’ve witnessed, it may be needed.  If you love sport or exercise, why not start a team?  Why not organise lots of teams and start your own league?  Use Facebook and Twitter to publicise it.  Make links within your local sporting community and work together; you can find them on Facebook and Twitter!  Do it to raise money for charity.  If you don’t want to start an adult’s team or league, do it for local children.  If you don’t know how to organise it, then research it and find out.  Perhaps you can start a running club or start your own boot camp in the park (pool resources with friends) and don’t be under the illusion that it all takes money that you don’t have.  Nothing I’ve suggested so far requires any cash.  Are you a poet, a writer, an illustrator, a musician, a lover of fashion or technology? Get blogging and show off your ideas and share them with other people.  Follow other people’s blogs and see what ideas you could use; get inspired!  What would you like to do as a job?  Do you need to work for someone else?  Setting up your own website needn’t cost any more that £15 a month at the most and with social media, marketing is free.  If you keep hearing ‘no’ from employers, go out and do it yourself.  Don’t think you’re good enough?  Nothing ventured, is nothing gained.  It’s your choice but just have a go at exercising some lateral thinking!

Top 5 tips for healthier thinking

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Peace of mind.

I really enjoy researching and learning about what it takes to develop healthier thinking and have been privileged to have listened to some very inspiring and motivating speakers from various areas of psychology this year. As it is the last day of 2013, many of you will be reflecting on your year and what changes you would like to make in 2014. So in my final post of 2013, I would like to share with you the most helpful advice I have learnt and which I have found the most beneficial myself (they are by no means in order of priority).

1. Take personal responsibility: Who do you blame when things go wrong? If you look deep down, does your critic have a valid point? Insensitive words may have a good intention behind them. If so, swallow your pride and ask their advice on how to improve. If they are in fact a complete idiot that is not worthy of your time, then set about changing your situation. Yes, this may mean some temporary discomfort if you have to leave a job or a relationship you’re in, but nothing worth having comes without some sort of sacrifice.

2. Develop a flexible attitude: Many of our negative emotions come from inflexible expectations that we hold; usually over how other’s should behave around us. Have you ever been left feeling irritated because someone has pushed their way onto the train without letting you off first? We are all guilty of holding rigid expectations, ‘how dare they not wait for me to get off the train, everyone knows it’s polite to let people off first!’. Yes, in an ideal world, everyone would be polite and considerate but unfortunately there is no law that enforces this. Getting angry isn’t going to make your feel any better about it. Practice thinking in a more flexible way, ‘I really would have preferred it if that person/idiot had been polite and let me off first but they didn’t have too’.

3. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket: How many friends do you have (if you’re not guilty of it yourself) that pin all their happiness on their relationship or career? All their happiness is dependent on one factor and one factor only; you hear them say that without it, they just couldn’t bear it? Well that’s a recipe for disaster! Call me negative, but there are no certainties in life. If that one thing were to be taken away, they would have nothing and they would feel miserable. For your mental health, if nothing else, have a variety of goals or interests that give you an equal amount of satisfaction. You may be left feeling sad without one but at least your life will not feel empty and meaningless.

4. Don’t let anger fester and certainly don’t feed it: One of the most absurd things I’ve heard all year is that in Argentina, people (especially women) go to places where they can smash up office equipment to ‘relieve’ their anger. Upon first inspection this may sound like a good idea. I feel angry so I’ll take my anger out on something and then I’ll feel better. Fantastic but does that actually solve the problem or does it just treat the symptom? That amounts to taking painkillers to treat a whole in your head. How many of you when angry, instead of trying to resolve the issue, swept it under the carpet but went away and replayed the scenario in your head over and over again? Did it make you feel better or did it just feed your anger? Did it solve the problem? Do what you can to resolve the issue by talking about it to those concerned. If it can’t be resolved then change your attitude or your situation.

5. Recognise the difference between fact and prediction: Hands up if you’re a worrier. Hands up if you’re worried about something that hasn’t happened yet. You’ve probably heard this before, but I’ll say it again. The vast majority of our worries are based on something that we predict will happen, but in fact, never does. If you’re worried, write a list of all the evidence that you have to support that this worry will actually happen. How far did you get? Now write a list of all the ways that worrying is helping you? I bet that list was shorter than the first. Now think back to the last time you were worried, and the time before that. Did the thing you were worrying about actually happen as you imagined it? I bet not.

Have a wonderful New Year’s Eve: celebrate the good you’ve experienced this year, learn from the bad and do wonderful things in 2014!

Who do you blame when things go wrong?

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A few months ago, I attended a lecture given by Dr Raj Persaud, a Consultant Psychiatrist based in London. The subject of his lecture was motivation; a subject that links nicely to my post yesterday. Yesterday I spoke about the importance of considering the sacrifices you will need to make in the pursuit of your New Year’s resolution; if you want something badly enough, a good measure of your motivation is to think about what comforts you are willing to give up in order to achieve your goal.

Dr Persaud began his lecture by showing the audience a clip from Rocky Balboa (2006) in which Rocky’s son complains that sharing the ‘Balboa’ name has been difficult to live with and warns Rocky of the negative impact his impending fight will have on his own career. Rocky hits back at his son’s words with a humbling reminder of the virtues of personal responsibility and the importance of fighting on when things go wrong.

After we watched the clip, Dr Persaud explained that when it comes to motivation, there are two personality types: internalities and externalities. Individuals with internalities are those who are more likely to enjoy success in life because when something goes wrong, they will look first of all at what they could have done differently. Individuals with externalities are those who are less likely to enjoy success in life because when something goes wrong, they will look first of all at other individuals or events to blame.

Internalities, when exercising personal responsibility, have power.  They have power because if they find the fault with themselves, they can set about changing the fault, learn from their mistake and move forwards.

Externalities lack self awareness and the ability to exercise personal responsibility. By blaming other individuals or events, they are powerless as the ability to change these factors is outside their direct control. They will find themselves wallowing in self-pity and anger and will ultimately hold themselves back just as Rocky’s son would have done.

So when you face the first hurdle on your journey to fulfilling your New Year’s Resolution, or any goal for that matter (and you will face hurdles), think about which personality type you fit into: are you an internality or and externality?